4th Of July To This Black Person

It is the 4th of July and considered the birth of our nation. So does this then mean that this is also the death of the Native American nation? I always wonder what exactly about this day do I or other blacks have to celebrate. We weren’t even considered full human beings on this day in 1776. In fact most of the celebrations that take place on this day are referred to as freedom festivals. While white people were celebrating their freedom they were hell bent on denying this same right to not only the blacks but the Native Americans from which this land was taken to begin with.

I must admit that my family use to celebrate with Bar B Q and a picnic and a ton of fireworks. But, the problem I have with this now is that my parents just like many other black Americans today, don’t think one bit about the holiday. What this holiday means or what it is all about. Now of course I will get the tired old comments about us all being American and that this is a celebration of our great country etc. Yet, how many of you can tell me what is so great about a time in history where my ancestors were undoubtedly considered non human beasts of burden by a bunch of racists. These racists gobbled up a nation from a once great people and wrote a declaration of independence speaking of freedoms that they wholeheartedly denied my people in no uncertain terms.

I am sure that this offends people, it should and it offends me that I am looked at as being unpatriotic because I dare to question the validity of this holiday for me and people like me. When in fact this holiday is not for me or other blacks and was never meant to be for us. At the time of our forefathers they would have guffawed and snorted had they been told that blacks would be participating in the festivities and not as servants. Frederick Douglass said about this day “This, for the purpose of this celebration, is the Fourth of July. It is the birth day of your National Independence, and of your political freedom. This, to you, as what the Passover was to the emancipated people of God. It carries your minds back to the day, and to the act of your great deliverance; and to the signs, and to the wonders, associated with that act, and that day.”

And I will leave you with Douglass’s words on what the 4th of July is to a nation of slaves. “What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciation of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade and solemnity, are, to Him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy-a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of the United States, at this very hour.”

Hopefully you will all think on these words and ask yourself what does this day mean to the descendants of slaves.

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18 Comments

Filed under African American, American society, Black community, Black Culture, Black People, Minorities, Racism, Social Issues, Thoughts

18 responses to “4th Of July To This Black Person

  1. The Engineer

    To The Black Sentinel:

    My sentiments exactly, and those are very eloquent words by Mr. Frederick Douglass.

    By the way, by choice, I am working today.

    Thank you for listening.

  2. The Engineer,

    Thanks. I always work these holidays myself as well. I don’t see them as holidays so there is no reason I should not continue business as usual.

    Thanks for the reply.

  3. The cartoon is very apt. While Mr. Jefferson was working on developing the constitution and the other documents of pretty words full of inspiration for white people, he turned his back on the black community that he helped to subjugate and his black children that he fathered and failed to show responsibility for. Mr. Jefferson was probably one of those fathers that Mr. Obama was talking about.

    Like you I came from a family where we celebrated this holiday and many others without one thought as to why. Black people who celebrate the 4th of July and the other holidays without thinking about their impact on the black community have forgotten their history and are dooming us to repeat it over and over again. Everyday we see how America subjugates black people. But we want to celebrate freedom, justice, and the American way of life.

    Excellent posting! Happy England can go to hell day!

    Peace

  4. The Engineer

    Here is a weblink to a recent news report on a lady that sang a very different National Anthem. The article is entitled, “Controversy after singer substitutes ‘black national anthem’ for ‘Star-Spangled Banner'”
    http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/07/controversy-aft.html
    Here are a few excerpts:


    Marie tells The Denver Post she decided to switch the lyrics months ago and will no longer sing the national anthem because she sometimes feels like a foreigner in the USA.

    I believe many of us feel that way, Ms. Marie.

    Thank you for listening.

  5. The Engineer,

    Thanks for this link. It is obviously OK for white people to force the Star Spangled Banner upon us even though when it became the National Anthem we were still under Jim Crow laws. And when it was written we were still slaves.

    So as far as I am concerned she has every right NOT to sing that sham song since it damn well never applied to us.

    Thanks for the reply.

  6. BlackinIdaho

    I like your post, it’s quite clever. I’m black, live in Idaho, married to a Native American, and I’m always stared at like I’m a zoo animal. I was annoyed by something that happened here so I typed in “being black in Idaho” and your blog popped up. I like what I read so far, I’ll have to come back again…

    Oh and I moved here from Atlanta, talk about culture shock!

  7. BlackinIdaho,

    I feel you as we just moved from Idaho to St. Louis and just seeing so many other black faces is a shock. A good shock but a shock none the less.

    I also felt like I was living in the zoo when living in Idaho. White people assume that no black person could possibly be uncomfortable living around all white people. I have had white people say “it must have been nice to live around all the white people, you must have felt safe. Unlike living in the ghetto.” What? I feel less secure living around a bunch of white people, whose race has a history of attacking people of my race at the drop of a dime when they outnumber us.

    My son had to go through the “can I touch your hair” constantly at school. It is a pain and they don’t even realize that they are treating people as if they are objects to be examined, touched and experienced.

    Thanks so much for you reply. Hopefully things go well for you and you husband there.

  8. Hopefully you will all think on these words and ask yourself what does this day mean to the descendants of slaves.

    Don’t you think it would be better if people thought about Frederick Douglass’ words in their entirety when asking themselves what this day means to the descendants of slaves?

    Slavery was absolutely a horrendous crime against humanity, but Douglass’ moving speech was one of great hope, and I am convinced, reading it in it’s entirety, that were he alive today, he would very much be celebrating the Fourth of July…

    To put the above quotes in some context:

    Fellow-citizens, pardon me, allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here to-day? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits and express devout gratitude for the blessings resulting from your independence to us?

    Would to God, both for your sakes and ours, that an affirmative answer could be truthfully returned to these questions! Then would my task be light, and my burden easy and delightful. For who is there so cold, that a nation’s sympathy could not warm him? Who so obdurate and dead to the claims of gratitude, that would not thankfully acknowledge such priceless benefits? Who so stolid and selfish, that would not give his voice to swell the hallelujahs of a nation’s jubilee, when the chains of servitude had been torn from his limbs? I am not that man. In a case like that, the dumb might eloquently speak, and the “lame man leap as an hart.” …

    and this:

    But I differ from those who charge this baseness on the framers of the Constitution of the United States. It is a slander upon their memory, at least, so I believe.

    …Fellow-citizens! there is no matter in respect to which, the people of the North have allowed themselves to be so ruinously imposed upon, as that of the pro-slavery character of the Constitution. In that instrument I hold there is neither warrant, license, nor sanction of the hateful thing; but, interpreted as it ought to be interpreted, the Constitution is a GLORIOUS LIBERTY DOCUMENT. Read its preamble, consider its purposes. Is slavery among them? Is it at the gateway? or is it in the temple? It is neither.

    Or this:

    Allow me to say, in conclusion, notwithstanding the dark picture I have this day presented of the state of the nation, I do not despair of this country. There are forces in operation, which must inevitably work The downfall of slavery. “The arm of the Lord is not shortened,” and the doom of slavery is certain. I, therefore, leave off where I began, with hope. While drawing encouragement from the Declaration of Independence, the great principles it contains, and the genius of American Institutions, my spirit is also cheered by the obvious tendencies of the age.

    Frederick Douglass rightly condemned America’s slave-holding and trading. As I said, it was a great crime against humanity, but slavery existed in his day. I think Douglass, the man who also said in another speech:

    “Everybody has asked the question … ‘What shall we do with the Negro?’ I have had but one answer from the beginning. Do nothing with us! Your doing with us has already played the mischief with us. Do nothing with us!

    …if the Negro cannot stand on his own legs, let him fall”

    …would come to very different conclusions than this post has, and would very much celebrate the Fouth of July, and this great nation, were he alive today.

    And lastly, contrary to your perceptions, I have always understood that

  9. oh no, I accidentally clicked on submit before I finished what I was saying.

    Which was, that contrary to your perception, I have always understood that it must be very uncomfortable, at least at times if not all the time, to be a black person living among all or mostly white people.

    And I am sorry some people said such ridiculously offensive things to you, and I’m sorry your son was made to feel uncomfortable at school. But that last point reminds me of a good friend of mine. Her father was stationed in Japan for much of her youth, which means that’s where she grew up. And she was white, with long red hair no less. They stared, and pointed and spoke to eachother in words she couldnt understand. And boy did they want to touch her hair. Everywhere she went.

    I’m not relaying this to suggest her experience is the same or to dismiss your son’s story. Rather to point out that people, and kids especially, are curious about things that are different than what they are used to. And maybe I’m wrong, but I suspect there was no intent to be offensive, even if it was taken that way. I understand it’s insensitive. But isn’t it also natural curiosity? And while we need to teach children to be thoughtful, shouldn’t we also be teaching our children that curiosity is at least understandable?

  10. American Elephant,

    I don’t think that I in anyway misunderstood what his intent was. As I did do a lot of reading of other things he wrote at the time. He was not in any way enamored or understanding of this country. You might need to look into Douglass a bit more. He was NOT enamored with America and would NOT be here heralding it right now.

    Unfortunately, for you he and pretty much all other civil rights fighters would not sit and praise a country that after all these years still allows a part of its citizens to continue to be second class citizens to this day.

    How does this satisfy what he spoke to on that day? How does continuing to support white privilege, discrimination and racism somehow make this country something for any civil rights leader to celebrate? It doesn’t and therefor I can not support the thoughts that he would celebrate this continued travesty of justice.

    I am sorry too that you think that it is just curiosity that drives kids to pick on other children. I think that is a learned behavior. We are not talking about just looking at differences we are talking about stereotypical picking. Where these kids are picking out things they have learned IS what blacks are and using it as questions etc.

    And I don’t think that black people have much to celebrate in this country. How many years have we been supposedly moving towards equality? How long should it take? Would white people wait this long for equality? See that question is never going to be answered because they don’t have to worry about getting equality. So then want to place their experience in America to how a black person should feel about it. We live in a totally different America than any white person, red haired or not.

    Thanks for the reply.

  11. As I did do a lot of reading of other things he wrote at the time. He was not in any way enamored or understanding of this country.

    I couldn’t disagree more. I have read quite a bit of his works, and firstly I think your implication that it is necessary to read his other works in order to understand that he really didn’t mean what he said here is as misleading as not providing the context of the quotes you provided above was.

    I never said he was enamoured with America. He was highly critical of its “present” as he says here, but he saw the great hope and wisdom of the founding documents of this country, and was very hopeful for Americas future.

    But I differ from those who charge this baseness on the framers of the Constitution of the United States. It is a slander upon their memory, at least, so I believe.[my emphasis]

    …interpreted as it ought to be interpreted, the Constitution is a GLORIOUS LIBERTY DOCUMENT. [his emphasis, not mine]

    …notwithstanding the dark picture I have this day presented of the state of the nation, I do not despair of this country. There are forces in operation, which must inevitably work The downfall of slavery. “The arm of the Lord is not shortened,” and the doom of slavery is certain. I, therefore, leave off where I began, with hope. While drawing encouragement from the Declaration of Independence, the great principles it contains, and the genius of American Institutions, my spirit is also cheered by the obvious tendencies of the age. [emphasis mine]

    …Then would my task be light, and my burden easy and delightful. For who is there so cold, that a nation’s sympathy could not warm him? Who so obdurate and dead to the claims of gratitude, that would not thankfully acknowledge such priceless benefits? Who so stolid and selfish, that would not give his voice to swell the hallelujahs of a nation’s jubilee, when the chains of servitude had been torn from his limbs?

    And I included his quotes on allowing the black person to stand on his own two feet or fall as he will, on purpose as well.

    But help me understand your point of view. What liberty do I have that you do not? How — when a black man is today one of the mere handful of men who have been viable candidates for the President of the United States, indeed is one of the even smaller group that can claim to be the leading candidate — are black men and women second class citizens? Or as Douglass puts it, how are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in the Declaration of Independence, not extended to you?

    And lastly, perhaps there is more to the story of your son having other children ask to touch his hair than you reported. Maybe they were doing so in a malicious manner. You only said that they were asking to touch his hair, like the Japanese children were asking to touch my friends hair because red hair was very different to them. Was it not just curiosity? Were they trying to be mean?

  12. American Elephant,

    He was highly critical of his “present” America. What would make him less critical of our “present” America? We still have the same senseless racism. Blacks are still treated without respect. The black race still does NOT earn what white America earns. Blacks are still in poverty like they were when he was in his “present” America. So therefore I would have to believe he would be just as critical.

    There is a lot to my story that isn’t necessarily in the post. I didn’t want it to be totally about our treatment. I wanted it to be about the fact that blacks are in a country that separates them and then expects them to celebrate its freedom. All the while we had none. I am sorry I don’t feel one iota of pride in a country who would beat my son to death in the street like a dog for the color of his skin.

    One black man ascending the ranks of the American dream does not mean all blacks are being fairly treated. That would be like saying Bill Gates is a billionaire so no longer do we have poor white people in America. How can anyone justify such a statement.

    How about the liberty to walk into any situation and know that you are represented. You are able to walk into a job interview or any other situation and NOT be judged by you skin or by others in your race. You can be sure that you will NOT be denied fair housing, healthcare or pay due to your skin color. You can turn on any channel at any time and see people of your race represented without stereotypes. And for every stereotypical white person they do show, there are many more who are depicted as upstanding and moral. If you ask to speak to the manager at a business you can be assured that 99% of the time you will be talking to someone of your race.

    You will probably never have to be the only one of your race in the workplace. You have never been held up as the spokesperson of your race. You have probably not had to live down stereotypes of your race. The list goes on and on. Trust me there are a lot of things you can take for granted just because you are not black. And one of them is not having to understand the black race as it is not imperative to you in order to live in this world. I on the other hand MUST have knowledge of white culture in order to just make it in the world.

    The next time a black man is beaten silly in the street by police officers and NOT ONE person who had a hand in the beating has to take responsibility for their crime, then you ask why the constitution doesn’t apply to that obvious second class citizen. The next time a black person is shot 20 to 30 times due to “contagious shooting” by the cops even when they have committed no crime, then ask about the constitution for that second class citizen.

    How about the next time another organization such as the American Medical Association apologizes for working to keep blacks out of the medical profession, we all can ask about the constitution and why the “all men are created equal” didn’t apply to the blacks who have suffered due to that organizations hard work of keeping us out.

    Like I have said before, we live in two distinctly different America’s. I live in an America where being thought of as a second class citizen when I walk into a business and get stares, glares and rude service if any at all, is still acceptable. Yep, this still goes on in America. And that is part of being white, not having to know anything about it.

    Thanks

  13. He was highly critical of his “present” America. What would make him less critical of our “present” America? We still have the same senseless racism.

    Wow. Just wow.

    I suspected you would compare America today to slavery, but it is still staggering seeing you actually do it.

    I’ll tell you what would make him less critical — that you wake up every day with all the same freedoms I do.

    Frankly, I think Douglass, and King, for that matter, would be ashamed of your attitude.

    We still have the same senseless racism. Blacks are still treated without respect. The black race still does NOT earn what white America earns. Blacks are still in poverty like they were when he was in his “present” America.

    Wrong. If you adjust for marriage, black people who are married, who come from homes where both the mother and father are present are virtually indistinguishable from white people in terms of income, education, etc.

    But I suppose the fact that 70% of black children are born out of wedlock is somehow the fault of white people in your mind.

    You are also wrong, in that black African immigrants to America are doing far better than black Americans. Hispanics are doing far better than black people, Asians are doing better than black people and white people.

    America, indeed, no one, can be responsible for the outcome of your life. Only you can do that. All America can do is make sure you have equal access to opportunity.

    You do.

    Blacks have all the same rights to an education that white people do. We even bus black people into wealthier neighborhoods to try to account for income disparity, something we dont do for poor whites. Yet, as some black activists are willing to admit, there is a black cultural taboo in school against studying, lest it appear that black kids, by studying, are “acting white.” Black kids are also documented to watch far more television and study far less than other children.

    America is not responsible for people’s choices. And it is clear from reading this blog, that you choose to be a victim. I point out how kids in Japan do the exact same things towards a girl with red hair, and to you, its not the same! They arent being racist! WHITE kids are racist! John McCain is a bigot because he thinks the best thing for children is to have a father and a mother.

    But it really is your comparison of today to slavery, a comparison I suspected you would make, that really makes it clear you are, and will always remain a slave, in your own mind. And there is nothing anyone can do to fix that, because it is your problem, not society’s.

    I am absolutely certain Douglass would agree with me, and would be ashamed of your attitude.

    “Everybody has asked the question … ‘What shall we do with the Negro?’ I have had but one answer from the beginning. Do nothing with us! Your doing with us has already played the mischief with us. Do nothing with us!

    …if the Negro cannot stand on his own legs, let him fall”

  14. American Elephant,

    Get real, I did not compare today with slavery. If you understand anything about him then you obviously know that he wasn’t a SLAVE at the time he was doing all the speaking. I was comparing a country which had a time of systemic racism to the country now which has systemic racism. So please don’t insult me.

    Unfortunately you live in fantasy land and I don’t live there. I wake up with the knowledge that I don’t have the same freedom from being discriminated against. I don’t have the same freedom NOT to be racially profiled by police, employers and random people from the majority race. So don’t presume to know what black people such as myself wake up to. White privilege is alive and kicking and if you are going to say it is not then you really need to get out and see the world.

    Your statement “If you adjust for marriage, black people who are married, who come from homes where both the mother and father are present are virtually indistinguishable from white people in terms of income, education, etc.” is totally false and incorrect. Where did you get theses statistics from? Here is a quote from March 8th 2008:

    “That is, while African-Americans do earn less than whites, asset gaps remain large even when we compare black and white families at the same income levels. For instance, at the lower end of the economic spectrum (incomes less than $15,000 per year), the median African-American family has a net worth of zero, while the equivalent white family’s net worth is $10,000. Likewise, among the often-heralded new black middle class, the typical white family earning $40,000 per year enjoys a nest egg of around $80,000; its African-American counterpart has less than half that amount.”

    I don’t see where you get that any white/black family is equal and these statistics are representative of equal family status. And just because 70% (where you got this stat who knows) are supposedly born out of wedlock does not equate to single parent family. People have children all the time out of wedlock and are a two family home, but that is NOT counted as two parent home. So please don’t try to be condescending.

    No one is responsible for anyone else doing poorly. Sure tell that to all the black doctor wannabes who were denied that supposed freedom by the AMA who admitted that they kept blacks from becoming doctors. I guess you will tell me that it was all on those blacks and the AMA is innocent even though they apologized for their ill doings. Or will you tell me this is somehow isolated. I love that one.

    Give me a break your little “acting white” statement is as good as urban legend. I did very well in school and got great grades, my sister had the best grades of her school, my son is on the honor roll and in advanced placement classes. And I have never heard this whole “acting white” thing nor has anyone I know and they all did well in all black schools. So exactly where is this coming from? I have asked so many people smart and not and they don’t know anyone hearing this. So I can’t speak to its reality. I know after that crap was aired on CNN I read hundreds of comments and those people said it was a load of crap. Thanks though.

    And fall he does. Is it a wonder why schools in black areas are failing, have NO funding, have NO resources? Is it a wonder that all things being equal blacks still make 76% (new stat) of their white counterpart. But of course blacks have to climb out of the hole dug for them before they can stand on their own. Maybe we should look at helping all people the way we will go out of our way to make sure schools in white areas have what they need. Or that we make sure that white people are paid what they are worth. But don’t let me or any other black complain, because regardless of reality according to those like you we are doing so much better. It may not be equal but take what you can get and shut up right?

  15. Really numbers went up? Well according to Washington.edu who did a study on it with U of California Irvine “The decrease in minority enrollments in
    Washington State is not an isolated case. In
    California, minority applications and enroll-
    ments dropped dramatically at many cam-
    puses of the University of California system
    following rulings by the university’s Board of
    Regents and a proposition passed by state
    voters to eliminate race-conscious admissions
    decisions (Lomibao, Barreto, and Pachon
    2004; University of California 2003). ”

    The numbers are slowly trying to rebound but are nowhere near going higher than they were. So I have no idea where you got those statistics. Please I am extremely interested in how they forced the people to be color blind. Because according to the American Psychological Association “Data indicate that the biases against minorities and women that humans show in laboratory settings are reflected in real-world practices. According to the March 1995 report of the Federal Glass Ceiling Commission, for example, a large proportion of minorities and women are locked into low-wage, low-prestige, and dead-end jobs. Additional data suggest that these two groups have been disproportionately affected by current trends in workforce downsizing; many service-oriented industries, for example, disproportionately employ women and minorities and are likely to continue downsizing through the year 2002. It is likely that the minorities and women who work in these industries will be hardest hit (Murrell and Jones, 1995).” But I guess they are a bunch of liberals who can’t be trusted.

    They also talked about how there IS preferential treatment in hiring which is surely the same as admissions, “The reality is that most, if not all, hiring decisions involve some sort of unspoken preferential treatment. Sometimes the decision is based on a personal connection or relationship; sometimes it is based on likeability or comfort level (Wilson, 1995). In fact, the Federal Glass Ceiling Commission (1995) confirmed that white men tend to be more comfortable with, and therefore more likely to hire and promote, other white men, thus revealing the prevalence of racial- and gender-based preferential treatment.”

    Or is it your contention that since YOU don’t see this preferential treatment it doesn’t happen in todays age. I guess you have an excuse as to why white people are over represented in the workplace and in higher education. I don’t think it is because blacks are that backward crying because they come from a single parent and just can’t get it together. If that were the case then shouldn’t Obama be in prison, he does come from a single mother.

    How about this, Racism exists and it doesn’t hinge on whether you see it or not. Discrimination exists and it also doesn’t hinge on whether or not you see it. You may not engage in judging people by the color of their skin but a LOT of people do. Are you vouching for each and every person NOT of color out there and whether or not they discriminate? I wouldn’t vouch for every black person out on whether or not they try hard and do what it takes to make it. Because I believe that everyone is different. There are some blacks who fail because of themselves and there are those who are sabotaged to fail. Can you admit to that? Or are you a person who feels that by passing a few laws we have leveled the playing field and changed everyones views?

  16. I see that the Engineer was answering to something that the American Elephant said. So I have moved this comment from another post to where American Elephant will see it. Plus it is extremely pertinent to the conversation on this post. Thanks.

    University of Washington News article
    dated January 18, 2001
    entitled,
    “Number of black, Hispanic, American Indian freshmen drops from 9 percent to 6 percent in wake of I-200”
    by Joel Schwarz
    http://www.uwnews.org/article.asp?articleID=2222
    Here are few excerpts:


    Although the actual number of blacks and American Indians admitted to the UW in 2000 rebounded slightly, the percentage of underrepresented minorities enrolled at the university dropped from 9 percent in 1998 to 6 percent in 2000, according to Charles Hirschman, UW sociology professor and co-author of the study. The drop among Hispanic students was the most pronounced, falling from just under 5 percent of the 1998 freshman class to less than 3 percent in 2000.

    “Affirmative action has two roles,” added Hirschman. “With it, an institution bends over backward to be fair and even takes an extra look at minority candidates. It also gives the symbolic messages, ‘we want you’ and ‘we are making an extra effort and you are welcome here.’

    “When this was taken away by I-200, many minority students may have felt they weren’t welcome at the UW. There is a certain amount of anxiety in going away to college. Affirmative action helps take away some of that anxiety.”

    While the percentage of black, Hispanic and American Indian students declined at the UW, the percentage of Asian American students continued to climb, rising from 24 percent of the freshman class in 1998 to 26 percent in 2000. Asian American students applied in higher numbers, were accepted at the same rate and enrolled at a much higher rate. In raw numbers, Asian Americans enrolling jumped from 1,015 to 1,271 students.

    A similar trend occurred in the University of California system.

    “Nonetheless, liberals have been fighting the policy change ever since — they refuse to believe that black people are not victims who cannot succeed on their own — despite the facts to the contrary.”
    — quotation of American Elephant

    Facts?

    Thank you for listening.

  17. my view

    I agree with the black sentinel that there is still racism. When ever I turn on the TV there is always coverage depicting black people as “bad” and “dangerous” in one case a while ago a white mother drowned her two kids and said a black male did it, because it was easy to point fingers at blacks, and many people bought her story. In our current America blacks are the poster boys for crime and poverty. It just kills me to see a black man walk by a white woman and to see her bring her purse closer to herself and tighten her grip on it, assuming it will be stolen by the black man. I belive that the fourth of July , a day that symbolizes freedom, is a day that black America needs to realize was never really true freedom for them. They should not celebrate it nor should any race in America celebrate it till all of america is truely free and not judged by race, sex or beliefs.

  18. My view,

    Great reply indeed. I don’t understand how this holiday was ever turned into something that races other than white look at as if it were the end all of holidays for them.

    This was never meant for us nor would it ever had some of the people had their way back then. We would not only still be slaves but we would more than likely serving their mint juleps on that day.

    Thanks for reply.

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